You Said, We Did

You told us what you wanted - this is what we did
Answer:

The Bournemouth Opinion Survey is carried out once every two years.

The 2013 survey was carried out from October - December 2013. We asked residents what they thought about our services and of living in Bournemouth. The results help us see if anything needs to be improved and if new initiatives are making a difference. 

You can see the full report from the 2013 survey, and a results summary of the main questions plus comments from service managers about how they intend to use the results.

 

Answer:

We asked:

We asked DOTS Disability to assess the plans for the road improvement scheme at Christchurch Road, Boscombe.  The scheme incorporates a ‘comfort space’ and a ‘vehicle space’ with a ‘shared space’ between them. It is designed to remove the clear divisions between pedestrians and vehicles, naturally slowing down drivers while giving greater priority to pedestrians.  DOTS had a number of suggestions to make the scheme better for people with disabilities.

You said:

DOTS were concerned that having no clear division between pavement and road could allow visually impaired pedestrians to accidentally wander into the vehicle space.  They recommend a kerb of at least 60mm between the comfort space and the shared space to help visually impaired people stay in a safe area.  Incorporating a kerb for visually impaired people can create a barrier for wheelchair users, preventing them from using the shared space or crossing the road.  Regular access points are needed for wheelchair users to move between the spaces. 

We did:

The scheme includes a 60mm kerb face.  Wheelchair users in the group were content that the five courtesy crossings (where the road rises to meet the level of the shared space) would provide enough opportunity for them to move between spaces.

You said:

The scheme includes five courtesy crossings where the road narrows and the road surface rises to meet the comfort space level.  The original plans showed these crossings being highlighted with a striped road surface.  DOTS felt that this may be confusing to partially sighted users who may think that they are at a zebra crossing.  A contrasting solid colour was suggested instead and the group felt that light grey would provide the greatest contrast with the road surface. 

We did:

The proposed stripes have been replaced with a solid colour.  However it was felt that the light grey colour chosen would soon become marked so a mid grey colour has been used instead.  There will be dark grey tactile paving at the crossing points which will provide a contrast for visually impaired people while not being mistaken for a controlled or zebra crossing.

You said:

A disabled parking bay for two cars is included in the scheme.  DOTS were concerned that drivers who use a wheelchair would be transferring from car to wheelchair in the vehicle space.  Wheelchair users would also need the kerb around the parking bay to be dropped to allow them access to the shared  / comfort space.  This could cause issues for white cane users who would be unable to detect the edge of the comfort space at this point.

We did:

The bays have been widened slightly to 2.5 metres which is the maximum that still allows for two-way traffic.  The kerb has been dropped and tramline paving installed to help guide visually impaired people past the bays.

You said:

DOTS members were concerned about the speed of vehicles passing through the area as there are no current plans for a reduced (20mph) speed limit.

We did:

The design of the scheme should naturally slow traffic to 20mph or less.  Speeds will be monitored following completion and a 20mph speed limit will be implemented if needed.

Answer:

We asked:

In May 2014 we asked DOTS Disability to assess the proposals for the Gardens of Light scheme in the Lower Gardens from the perspective of users with a disability.

You said:

New lighting should reduce ‘pooling’ of light which is distracting for visually impaired people

We did:

The lighting has been designed to remove pooling of light.

You said:

Where lampposts are placed on the footpath they should be surrounded by tactile paving which can be detected by white cane users, or moved to the edge of the path.

We did:

No lighting columns have been placed on the footpath.

You said:

Proposals for lighting that create moving patterns would be confusing for visually impaired people and should be avoided.

We did:

Following the comments from the group, the lighting scheme has been designed to provide general amenity lighting together with colour and projected static images. There is no intention to include moving patterns.

You said:

The new LED lights will be dimmable in the early hours of the morning to save energy.  The lowest setting should still be bright enough for CCTV to pick up usable images.

We did:

The new LED lights will provide suitable levels of lighting to enable CCTV to operate on the main footpaths and thoroughfares throughout the Gardens.

 

Other recommendations in the report referred to the existing structure and design of the gardens (such as steps, signs, etc.) and have been passed on to our Parks & Gardens team for future consideration.

Answer:

We asked: 

DOTS Disability were asked to conduct a survey of Horseshoe Common to advise on disability access.

You said:

DOTS provided a lengthy list of problems and ideas. These can be broadly summarised as:

1. Improve signs around the park, at entrances and junctions, to be more welcoming and to show accessible routes both through and around the park.

2. Improve path surfaces, repair broken surfaces, replace with resin bonded surfaces and provide an upstand at the edge of the pathways to help visually impaired people.

3. Cut back or remove plants and trees close to the paths and entrances to let in more natural light and to improve sight lines.

4.  Improve seating throughout the park, making sure benches have backs and arm rests, with paving alongside for wheelchairs. 

There were also a few specific recommendations including rebuilding the steps linking the park with Madeira Road to meet modern standards (BS8300)

We did:

The Horseshoe Common Masterplan is still being developed and most of the recommendations will be included.  Funding has not yet been secured to make the improvements.  There are some caveats.  Rebuilding the Madeira Road steps may prove too expensive but as a minimum they will be improved and handrails added on both sides.  The Council will aim to provide resin bonded path surfaces if budgets allow.  Trees and plants either side of the path will removed where they are of lesser quality and not protected by Planning.  As a compromise, those that remain can be thinned and/or crown lifted.

Answer:

The West Howe Residents Survey was carried out in the autumn of 2014.

A summary of the results and what is being done following the survey was published in the West Howe Now community newsletter Summer 2015

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